Jargon Buster

On this page we try and explain some of the jargon you might come across whilst looking for advice and help.

If you spot a piece of jargon that is not on this page get in contact with us here: admin@overthefence.org

This is when someone helps you when you find it hard to explain what you want or if you think that people aren’t listening to you.

You may have to talk about yourself and what you need when you are talking to providers of services or those people who make decisions about services for you. You may want an advocate to be there with you, to support you while you talk about what you need or to talk for you if that helps you and is what you want. The advocate will need to have got to know you and found out from you what you are wanting before they can help you properly.

Some people have a friend or relative who can take on an advocacy role on their behalf.

An independent advocate works with an advocacy project. They are independent of the Council and NHS and of care providers – they are there to meet the wishes and best interests of the people they support.

The Scottish Independent Advocacy Alliance is at www.siaa.org.uk

An assessment is when you meet with someone, usually a social worker, and talk about your circumstances and what your needs are. They will then decide if you are eligible for financial support from the Council towards costs of care and support. They will also be able to tell you about what care and support is available. You can have someone with you such as a family member or a friend when you have an assessment.

A broker service is when someone else helps you select the services and manage agreed aspects such as recruiting a Personal Assistant, having a contract with the service provider and/or paying the service provider on your behalf. You may have to pay for a broker service. Some people use broker services so that they don’t have to worry about some of the financial or management arrangements around their care services. The broker service will arrange the things that you ask them to do. You are still in charge.

The word carer is used to describe a relative or friend who takes on the role of looking out for, or looks after, someone who has health problems or other needs. They also sometimes get called ‘family carers’. There are laws which give carers a right to have their own needs considered, and they can get help in their own right. There are Carers’ Centres in each area which give carers information and advice. You will get their contact details under Local Help. The word ‘carer’ is also sometimes used to refer to the workers who provider care and support for people, for example in people’s own homes. Many people prefer the phrase ‘care worker’ here as it doesn’t confuse the roles of staff who are paid to help someone and people who help because they love and care about the person.

This is the official body that has a duty to inspect and regulate care provision, including day care and residential care. Care providers need to be registered with the Inspectorate and meet their standards. The Care Inspectorate produce reports about all their inspections and these are available for anyone to read. You can read a report about an organisation that you use or are thinking about using for social care services.

You can find the reports here: Click to link to reports

A care plan sets out the care someone needs and the services that will provide this. Each person should have their own care plan, which is based around their needs and reflects their experiences and views on what will work well for them. If the person wants it, their family and friends will also contribute to the care plan. When there are a lot of organisations or teams involved in providing care to a person, they should all know what is in the person’s care plan and how their part contributes to the overall support. Most services will also have a more detailed care plan for the support they give that person.

A Direct Payment is when the Council gives the money to pay for support to the person getting support and they then organise the support themselves. People who use care services have asked for this arrangement because it gives the person more choice and control. No-one can be made to use a Direct Payment if they do not want to do this. People can still have their support arranged and paid for directly by the Council. People in Scotland have been using Direct Payments for many years. The new Self-directed support arrangements that come into effect in April 2014 include Direct Payments. They include some changes which are designed to make it easier for more people to have access to a Direct Payment if they want this. There are some limits on Direct Payments, for example, when it would put the person at risk.

Older people (aged 65 and over) in Scotland get free personal care for things such as help with washing and getting dressed and with preparing meals. Older people may have to pay towards the costs of other types of services.

This is when an official body appoints someone to make decisions for you when you are not able to make decisions for yourself because of illness or disability. It can cover your welfare, your financial arrangements or both.

Also see:

Making decisions for others

This is another name for an Individual Service Fund or a Personal Budget. It is the amount of money the Council makes available to meet a person’s needs.

One of the options for Self-directed support (option 2) is to have a package of services that are arranged from the person’s individual budget. The person can then change the level of support across these services, as their circumstances change. The Council or another organisation manages all of the money side so the person does not need to deal with that. You can choose the organisation which co-ordinates things for you.

Also see:

Self-directed support options

This is another name for an Individual Budget or a Personal Budget. It is the amount of money the Council makes available to meet a person’s needs.

One of the options for Self-directed support (option 2) is to have a package of services that are arranged from the person’s individual budget. The person can then change the level of support across these services, as their circumstances change. The Council or another organisation manages all of the money side so the person does not need to deal with that. You can choose the organisation which co-ordinates things for you.

Also see:

Self-directed support options

This is about the difference the support will make to the way you want to live your life. The outcome is what you want to achieve because of the things that you are able to do with the support you get.

This is someone you employ to provide the care and support that you want. You have obligations to them because you are their employer. There are organisations that can help you if you want to employ a personal assistant.

www.spaen.org.uk

This is the actual amount of money that the Council will make available to meet a person’s social care needs as identified in an assessment and in their care plan.

One of the options for Self-directed support (option 2) is to have a package of services that are arranged from the person’s individual budget. The person can then change the level of support across these services, as their circumstances change.

The Council manages all of the money side so the person does not need to deal with that.

Also see:

Self-directed support options

This is an approach that aims to make social care and support reflect the wishes of the individual, their likes, dislikes, their circumstances and what they do. Services and supports  should fit in with the individual person rather than the person have to fit in with standard ways that services are provided

This is when one person gives someone else the power to make decisions for them. These are usually decisions about the person’s welfare but can also include looking after your money and all your affairs. This can be set up to start straight away or at some time in the future.

Also see:

Making decisions for others

This is a method which some Councils use to make decisions on how much money people are entitled to in order to get the support they need.

This is when the person who needs support starts the assessment process by describing what they think they need and want.

Sometimes the person answers a list of questions about their circumstances and needs so that a social worker, or someone in a similar role, can make an assessment. In other places people use a wider range of ways of describing themselves and what will help them achieve the outcomes that matter to them. Self-assessment stages are often used to let people take longer to think about what they want to say and  get the people they trust involved.

In each case, the purpose is to enable the person responsible for deciding about the level of support to make that decision. They can also take account of other information.

This is the phrase used to describe the system of choice between different ways that you can organise care services and other support.

You should be the one who directs – has control over – the support you get. The arrangements for organising the money side, and the choice people have over these,  are a means of letting people direct their support.

There are 4 options for Self-directed support in Scotland. Option 1 is a direct payment, Option 2 is an individual budget, Option 3 is the Council organising the care for you, and Option 4 is a combination of options 1, 2 & 3.

Everyone is entitled to get advice and information that is independent from the Council. The organisations which provide this are called SDS support organisations.

Some focus on giving people support and information about social care and SDS. Others also do other activities, such as provide advocacy or give peer support to older people or people who have health problems or to carers.

Also see:

Finding independent advice

Individual people can contact social work, health or other support organisations themselves and ask for a meeting to discuss their circumstances and find out what help they can get.

There are also support providers who people can contact direct.

Not every social care and health organisation is able to accept self referrals, sometimes your doctor or another professional has to refer you.

This is the name given to the services and organisations that provide support and help to people. They include social work, personal care and protection or social support services to children or adults who are in need or at risk. It includes support to people who need help and to their families and carers.

There are many different types of social care such as care services in your own home, residential, community support and activities, information and advice services and advocacy services.

Your support plan describes what things you want to be able to do to make things better for you and what support you would need to help you achieve these things. A support plan is usually wider than a care plan and includes other supports such as ordinary community services and activities.

Your support plan should be written up from discussions between you and a social worker. You can have other people with you when talking about your support plan.

The plan will explain how you will use any funding that you receive from the Council for care and support needs.

 

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